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Monday, October 10, 2011

Our World Tuesday, tea from a samovar

Here Alexey, a senior guide with Viking River Cruises, is in the dining room of the Viking Surkov explaining Russian tea-making using a samovar. He is holding an antique samovar for his demonstration.

"This is where they made the fire using any fuel they had available,
like wood chips, or dried cones from evergreen trees."

"Then they needed to encourage the fire, preferably using a small bellows."

"However, if they didn't have a small bellows, something like this was always handy."

Tea for the guests on the Viking Surkov, from a modern samovar.

"Cпасибо, (sounds like 'spa-see-bah') thank you."
© Photos by Richard Schear



Memories of our Russian holiday, posted for
the meme hosted by Arija, Gattina, Lady Fi, Sylvia and Sandy
in memory of the late Klaus Peter, originator of My World Tuesday.

24 comments:

Honey at 2805 said...

Kay, it's so much fun to travel along with you and you are really giving me the urge for a getaway! Another nice, long one like we did in April!

This river cruise looks amazing! You have been "on the road" since we met - the constant traveler!

ladyfi said...

Wow - tea from a real somavar! What fun!

ewok1993 said...

fascinating. i am reading new words for the first time. thanks for the education.

Martha Z said...

Interesting. I've seen samovars but I had no idea that they built a fire in them to heat the tea.
I've learned something new.

Sylvia K said...

Oh, yes! Thanks indeed for the education! I have so enjoyed your posts from your Russian trip. And a real somavar!! Wonderful! Thanks for the fun, Kay! Hope you have a great week!

Sylvia

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

There used to be a tea shop/restaurant in Seattle called 'the Russian Samovar'. There was one there,but just for decoration. I never knew before how it was actually used.

Kay L. Davies said...

You might notice that the samovar in the bottom photo is electric, unlike Alexey's antique which was lit with whatever fuel, like wood chips or dry pine cones, could be found nearby.
K

Rajesh said...

Wonderful experience. It looks unique.

kaykuala said...

Kay,
My,that's a whole lot of tea! You're living it up out there! There's a news report today that our Tourism Ministry is going all out to woo tourists from Russia. According to their survey there is a group of rich Russians making the rounds. Apparently they are bored with Europe and are heading East.
Your Dad had written river and adventure books? Wow, that's great! Is it on Canada and the US, and available on Amazon? Should be interesting! I'm a fishing enthusiast too. I had posted one in my other blog.

Hank

Gattina said...

The tea must have been delicious made in such a samovar ! Love the clothes too !

SquirrelQueen said...

I love the boot for a bellows!

Maybe it was the proximity to Russia but I saw quite a few samovars in Anchorage. I've never had tea from an antique one but I have had coffee from a modern one and it was quite tasty.

Jenn said...

Interesting way to make tea. Thanks for the info. I think that electric one comes in more handy. :)

Indrani said...

Wow! Never seen the process before. Great series.

Gary said...

Interesting Kay. Boom & Gary of the Vermilon River, Canada.

aka Penelope said...

Lol … I love the “boot” solution. Looks like they had fun amusing tourists with their ingenuity. Thanks as always, Kay, for sharing your adventures around the world.:)

Cezar and Léia said...

Very interesting tradition!So glad that you enjoyed this trip, it's a different world indeed!
Léia

Vagabonde said...

We came back from our trip to New York and I just finished reading all your update. You have been busy while I was away – 44 posts! That would take me several months! I enjoyed looking and reading about your trip to Russia. I like the Kalinka song and the wedding pictures. While in Russia I saw two weddings, one in front of the Hermitage museum. I had a film camera then, but I’ll find them.

We had a samovar in our apartment in Paris when I was growing up. I think it was just an ornament because we never made tea in it, wish we had. It looked just like the old one in your top picture. My mother asked me if I wanted it, but it was so big, I said no.

cieldequimper said...

Tea can be experienced in so many different ways and this one is a favourite of mine!

Carver said...

Great look at the tea being prepared. I bet it was delicious.

Ebie said...

Very interesting "tea party"!

Arija said...

I love the improvised bellows! Russians are great tea (and Vodka) drinkers and even on the trains they have a samovar. Certainly different to the Japanese tea ceremony.
It looks like you all had a great time.

♥~Judy~♥ said...

Wow! All that for tea, but I love tea.

jabblog said...

I believe samovars are still used on Russian trains!

Leslie said...

fascinating demonstration! but i liked best to see your smiling face at the end of it :)