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Monday, September 19, 2011

Our World Tuesday was their world, Kizhi, Russia

Village church
18th century farmhouse







Working the loom



Ornamental balcony outside attic window








Cradle, hanging nearby, was easy to rock
Scarecrow
Old boats, above, below

Woman going visiting
Enlarge photos for more detail. Richard Schear and Kay Davies photos, August 2011.
©



Embroidery




Everything from boats to sleds stored in the attic

Craftsman at work the old way, making pieces to repair the fine old buildings

Fence rails were tied together

Haying was a heavy job in the 18th century

Posted for Our World Tuesday
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23 comments:

Indrani said...

Interesting scenes from the village.

SandyCarlson said...

These are really interesting. Thanks for the trip to Russia!

Lesley said...

You must be spending hours and hours sorting through all your photos from this amazing trip!!

Carver said...

What a great set of photographs. That looks like somewhere I would enjoy visiting. I think it's great when traveling to see the rural parts of a country as well as the urban areas.

Kay L. Davies said...

@ Lesley — you are so right. Dick takes hundreds and hundreds of photos, and I take quite a few myself. It is a long job, sorting through them, but I enjoy it most of the time because he was able to get out every day, usually twice a day, on tours, and I couldn't manage that, so I like to see his pictures.
— K

Sylvia K said...

What a marvelous, interesting post for the day! And your photos are terrific as always! I have so enjoyed following your trip to Russia! Hope you have a great week, Kay!

Sylvia

Ann said...

baby's cradle. a working mum or just for display?

Rajesh said...

Wonderful wide variety of images.

ladyfi said...

What a beautiful and utterly magical church!

J Bar said...

Fascinating work. In my Syd Tech Coll shot, the animals are on the arch below the name. If you click on the link in the post, you can see a lizard and a platypus on the achitecture website. I'll have to go back and get some close up shots.
Sydney - City and Suburbs

Kay L. Davies said...

@ Ann — the people are in period costume and working at chores as they were done in the 17th century. The "mom" really is working on the loom, but the cradle was empty.
— K

@ J Bar — Oh, I'll click on the link. All I did was enlarge your photo. Thanks!
— K

Ebie said...

I love the intricate work of the eaves of the barn, so different from our red or just plain barn here.

The loom reminds me of those from back home in the Philippines.

Gattina said...

I am still amazed about these beautiful wooden carvings on the houses. Weaving looms I have seen in Morocco (for carpets) very interesting post !

Fran said...

This is more like the Russia my hubby saw when he was there helping renovate a children's orphanage x

Cezar and Léia said...

A different and so beautiful world there!Thanks for sharing these wonderful pictures!
Léia

Arija said...

Thank you for the reminder of times I can actually remember, honourably working the land. It reminds me of rural peace before WW11.

Francisca said...

This was an extra special post of a world gone by. I so like what Blogger has done with enlarging the photos so they can be seen almost like a slide show. That wood farmhouse is spectacular! Just terrific, Kay!

Leckeres für Mensch und Katze - Goodies for a pleasant life said...

Nice photos from your world :)

Seasons said...

These are very nice pictures of the old way of living. Especially like the picture of the craftsman, intently focused on his woodwork. Thanks!

Gary said...

Another interesting tour Kay. Boom & Gary of the Vermilon River, Canada.

Larry D said...

Very interesting series of images!

eileeninmd said...

Kay, thank you for taking on this lovely tour of Russia. It is interesting to see the countryside of Russia and the hardworking people.

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

Somehow I missed this post earlier -- thank goodness for Google Reader. What a great place this was -- that's my favorite way to learn history -- these kind of places really humanize it. Great pictures as always.